English

Aims/objectives

Grades 9 and 10 of the YIS English program have been designed to build on the foundation of knowledge and concepts introduced in Middle School MYP English. Students will continue to further develop their analytical, creative and critical thinking skills through an exploration of language and literature. In each student we hope to instill a lifelong interest in literature and the way it reflects the world around us. Students will study various texts and text types in preparation for the IBDP English A Courses (Literature / Language and Literature) which begin in Grade 11. It is the aim of the YIS English Department to inspire critical and creative thinkers, communicators, and lifelong readers.

Students are expected to take an active role in the learning process, which includes asking for further clarification and instruction if they encounter difficult parts of the course. The English Department is available to help and support students.

Skills

The grades 9 and 10 courses continue the development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students are encouraged to develop independent ideas in the study of literature and support them through close analysis of textual evidence. In addition to literary analysis, a variety of functional language skills are taught including summarizing, blog posts, script writing and persuasive writing. Students will work towards the improvement of writing through consistent practice. The development of specific language skills is integrated into lessons in response to common difficulties.

Assessment

Students in Grades 9-10 are assessed against the Middle Years Programme Language A assessment criteria:

A) Analysing

B) Organizing

C) Producing Text

D) Using Language

In order to give students the chance to demonstrate real understanding, they complete a range of assessments, both formative and summative, over the course of the two years. These may take the familiar form of essays written in class or at home, or the mandatory end of year examination in grades 9 and 10. However, assessment can also include a range of interpretative, expressive and creative tasks in the form of artifacts like posters, magazine articles, comic strips, transformations of stories, diaries or imagined responses to fictional contexts.


Language and Literature - Higher Level

Grade 11 Units of Study

Part 2: Language and Mass Communication

In part 2 students consider the way language is used in the media. Mass media include newspapers, magazines, the Internet (e.g. social networking), mobile telephony, radio and film. This unit also addresses the issue of how the production and reception of texts is influenced by the medium in which they are delivered.

External Assessment:

Written task 1

Written task 2

Internal Assessment:

Paper 1 comparative textual analysis activities

Further Oral Activities

Part 4: Literature--Critical Study

Three literary texts, all of which are chosen from the prescribed list of authors (PLA).

Close reading is considered to be a core skill in the understanding and interpretation of literature. By looking closely at the detail of literary texts, students develop awareness of their rich complexities and the intricacies of their construction.

External Assessment:

Written task 2

Internal Assessment:

Further Oral Activity
Individual Oral Commentary (IOC)

Paper 1 Exam preparation


Grade 12 Units of Study

Part 1: Language in Cultural Context

In this part of the course students are given the opportunity to explore how language develops in specific cultural contexts, how it impacts on the world, and the ways in which language shapes both individual and group identity. Topics for stimulating approaches to the unit are listed below, each of which implies a wide range of vocabulary and writing styles with which students should become familiar. Students studying this part of the course should pay particular attention to the role of language in constructing meaning and understanding particular issues in the world.

External Assessment:

Written task 1

Internal Assessment:

Paper 1 comparative textual analysis activities

Oral activity 1


Possible Topics:

Language and power (linguistic imperialism, propaganda, protest)

Language and communities (nation/region, subcultures, theory)

Language and social relations (social and professional status, race, hegemony)

Language and taboo (swearing, political correctness, customs)

Language and sexuality (constructions of orientation, discourse)


Part 3: Literature--Texts and Contexts

Three literary texts: one from the Prescribed Literature in Translation list (PLT), one from the Prescribed List of Authors (PLA) and one chosen freely.


Meaning in a text is shaped by culture and by the contexts of the circumstances of its production. It is also shaped by what the reader brings to it. Literary texts are not created in a vacuum but are influenced by social context, cultural heritage and historical change. Through the close reading of literary texts, students are able to consider the relationship between literature and issues at large, such as gender, power and identity. Students should be encouraged to consider how texts build upon and transform the inherited literary and cultural traditions. The compulsory study of translated texts encourages students to reflect on their own cultural assumptions through an examination of work produced in other languages and cultures.

External Assessment:

Written task 1 or 2


Internal Assessment:

Paper 1 comparative textual analysis activities

Paper 2 exam preparation

IB Examination

Paper 1: Comparative Textual Analysis

Students write an analysis on one of two pairs of previously unseen texts.

Paper 2: Essay

Students write an essay on one of six questions based on at least two of the texts studied in Part 3.

Overall Assessment Breakdown:

Paper 1: 25%

Paper 2: 25%

Written tasks: 20%

Students produce at least four written tasks based on the material studied in the course.

Students submit two of these tasks for external assessment.

One of the tasks must be a critical response to one of the prescribed questions for the HL additional study.

Each task should be 800-1,000 words in length; task 1 should be accompanied by a rationale of 200-300 words, while task 2 should be accompanied by a short outline.

Individual Oral Commentary: 15%

Further Oral Activity: 15%

Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course.

Assessment: Student work is assessed and graded according to the IBO’s task-specific assessment criteria. Each student has a copy of these criteria and is expected to use them as a learning tool.


Language and Literature - Standard Level

Grade 11 Units of Study

Part 1: Language in Cultural Context

In this part of the course students are given the opportunity to explore how language develops in specific cultural contexts, how it impacts on the world, and the ways in which language shapes both individual and group identity. Topics for stimulating approaches to the unit are listed below, each of which implies a wide range of vocabulary and writing styles with which students should become familiar. Students studying this part of the course should pay particular attention to the role of language in constructing meaning and understanding particular issues in the world.

External Assessment:

Written task

Internal Assessment:

Paper 1 textual analysis activities

Oral activity 2


Possible Topics:

Language and identity

Language change

Language and power

Part 4: Literature--Critical Study

Two literary texts, both of which are chosen from the prescribed list of authors (PLA).

Close reading is considered to be a core skill in the understanding and interpretation of literature. By looking closely at the detail of literary texts, students develop awareness of their rich complexities and the intricacies of their construction.

External Assessment:

Written task

Internal Assessment:

Individual Oral Commentary (IOC)

Paper 1 Exam preparation

Grade 12 Units of Study

Part 2: Language and Mass Communication

In part 2 students consider the way language is used in the media. Mass media include newspapers, magazines, the Internet (e.g. social networking), mobile telephony, radio and film. This unit also addresses the issue of how the production and reception of texts is influenced by the medium in which they are delivered.

External Assessment:

Written task

Internal Assessment:

Paper 1 textual analysis activities

Oral Activity 1


Possible Topics:

Bias in the news

Persuasive techniques used in advertising and other media

The rhetoric of public speeches

Part 3: Literature--Texts and Contexts

Two literary texts: one of which is a text in translation from the prescribed literature in translation (PLT) list and one, written in the language A studied, from the prescribed list of authors (PLA) for the language A studied, or chosen freely.

Meaning in a text is shaped by culture and by the contexts of the circumstances of its production. It is also shaped by what the reader brings to it. Literary texts are not created in a vacuum but are influenced by social context, cultural heritage and historical change. Through the close reading of literary texts, students are able to consider the relationship between literature and issues at large, such as gender, power and identity. Students should be encouraged to consider how texts build upon and transform the inherited literary and cultural traditions. The compulsory study of translated texts encourages students to reflect on their own cultural assumptions through an examination of work produced in other languages and cultures.

External Assessment:

Written task

Internal Assessment:

Paper 1 textual analysis activities

Paper 2 exam preparation

Overall Assessment Breakdown:

Paper 1: Textual Analysis 25%

The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis of one of these texts.

Paper 2: 25%

Students write an essay on one of six questions based on both of the texts studied in Part 3.

Written tasks: 20%

Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit one written task for external assessment.

This task must be 800–1,000 words in length plus a rationale of 200–300 words.

Individual Oral Commentary: 15%

Further Oral Activity: 15%

Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment.

Assessment:

Student work is assessed and graded according to the IBO’s task-specific assessment criteria. Each student has a copy of these criteria and is expected to use them as a learning tool.


Literature (HL)

Grade 11 Units of Study

Part 4: Options

Number of works: HL 3

Works are freely chosen by the teacher.

This part of the programme is designed to give teachers an opportunity to include in their courses works which reflect their particular interest or in some cases which meet specific needs of their students. All works may be chosen freely and any combination of works may be used, either in the Language A or in translation.

The intention in providing options is to enable teachers to freely choose their approach, in keeping with the aims and objectives of the course, whilst offering suggestions for the types of choices that are suitable for literary study at this level.

Assessment:

IOP

Part 1: Works in translation

Number of works: HL 3

This part of the course is a literary study of works in translation, based on close reading of the works themselves. Through that study students are encouraged to appreciate different perspectives of people from other cultures and to consider the role that culture plays in making sense of literary works.


In addition, this section aims to deepen the student’s understanding of works as being products of a time and place. Artistic, philosophical, sociological, historical and biographical considerations are some suggested areas of study to enhance understanding of the works.


Assessment:

Written Assignment: 1,200-1,500 words in length

To be submitted with Reflective Statement

Grade 12 Units of Study


Part 2: Detailed study

Number of works: HL 3

In Part 2, the focus is on detailed analysis of a work, both in terms of content and technique. It is in this section that students study some of the most important works in the major genres of their respective Languages A. The detailed study is best achieved through approaches that ensure close reading and in-depth analysis of the significant elements of the works involved. At HL one of the genre must be poetry.

Internal Assessment:

Individual Oral Commentary and Discussion: Formal oral commentary on poetry studied with subsequent questions (10 minutes) followed by a discussion based on one of the other works (10 minutes)

Part 3: Literary genres

Number of works studied: HL 4

All works must be chosen from the same literary genre of the Prescribed Book List (PBL) In Part 3, a group of works selected from the same literary genre is studied in depth. Each genre has recognisable techniques, which we refer to as literary conventions, and writers use these conventions, along with other literary features, in order to achieve particular artistic ends. The grouping of works by genre to provide a framework for the comparative study of the selected works through an exploration of the literary conventions and features associated with that genre.

External Assessment:

Paper 2 Essay. The paper consists of three questions for each literary genre. In response to one question students write an essay based on at least two works studied in part 3.

Overall Assessment Breakdown:

Paper 1: 20%

Literary commentary (2 hours). The paper consists of two passages: one prose and one poetry. Students choose one and write a literary commentary.

Paper 2: 25%

This paper consists of three questions for each literary genre. In response to one question students write an essay based on at least two works studied in part 3.

Written Assignment: 25%

Students submit a reflective statement and literary essay on one work studied in part 1.

Individual Oral Commentary: 15%

Individual Oral Presentation: 15%