High School Course Catalog


Table of Contents

Our Mission

Live Learn Lead

Our Values

We are mindful of the needs and rights of others. We are honest in our dealings.
We are peaceful in our intentions.
We are responsible in our actions.
We are supportive of each other.

“Our lives are the sum total of the choices we have made.” (Albert Camus)





Message from the Counseling Team

Dear Students:

In the following pages you will find useful information about the courses YIS offers at the high school level. We have tried to organize the information in a coherent and concise way in order to make it easier to browse through and make the best decisions for your program of studies. Remember to carefully think about the following factors when selecting courses:

  • Will you do well in a higher level DP course in this subject?
  • Will these subjects prepare you for your future goals?
  • Do the subjects you want to take satisfy the prerequisites for the IB diploma?
  • Do the subjects you want to take satisfy the prerequisites for specific university entry requirements and majors?
  • Are there any conflicts with YIS graduation requirements?
  • Will you be happy taking these courses?
  • Are you giving up a certain subject that you may regret later?
  • What are your interests?

You should also remember that you might not be able to take all of the subjects that you are interested in. This may be because of timetable issues, because the teacher in that subject feels that you will excel more in another subject, or because classes have become over-subscribed.

If you are not sure about which subjects to take, or whether or not you will do well in a particular subject, the best people to speak to are the subject teachers, the academic advisor and/or the IB diploma coordinator. You should also take this opportunity to discuss your future goals with your parents, and to ask their advice if you are not sure which courses are the “best” for you.

A Note on Prerequisites

Depending on your future goals, you will need to begin taking certain courses in high school. For example, if you plan to become a doctor, you should be taking as many science and math courses as you can manage.

Make sure you are taking the prerequisites for the university and/or department/course you are applying to. Check with the university if you aren’t sure which classes you should be taking now. You can check their website, email or call them. If you are planning to go to a British or Canadian university, be especially careful about prerequisites, in particular if you wish to enter a scientific field.

The most important thing to remember about prerequisites right now, though, is that they exist in high school, too! For example, make sure you know what the prerequisites are for each subject so that you don’t find out at the end of 10th grade that you can’t take the class you wanted to in 11th grade because you haven’t taken the introductory course in 10th grade.

May you choose wisely!

Hillary Hewins & Damien Pitter
Counselors and Academic Advisors




Important Course Selection Dates for Current YIS Students

Nov. 2, 2017

Course Selection Presentation for grade 10 students.

Nov. 2 - Dec. 1, 2017

Students consult with grade 10 teachers about DP choices. Parents can also chat with teachers at PTSCs.

Nov. 15, 2017

Course Selection Presentation for grade 10 parents.

Dec. 1, 2017

Last date by which grade 10 students should enter their preliminary ‘wish list’ for courses.

Please note: As a part of the course selection process, all students in grade 10 will meet individually with Ms. Hewins, Mr. Pitter, or Mr. Redlich.




YIS Graduation Requirements

In order to be awarded a YIS High School Diploma, students must fulfill the graduation requirements listed below regardless of any external examinations taken.

First, students must have at least the following number of course credits:

English - 4 credits
Mathematics - 3 credits
Modern Languages - 3 credits
Science - 3 credits
Social Sciences - 3 credits
Physical Education - 3 credits
The Arts - 2 credits
Theory of Knowledge - 1 credit
Design - 1 credit

One (1) credit is awarded for a course in which the student receives a passing grade and which meets four or more times a week for a full year of study. It should be noted that students who attend grades 9-12 at YIS typically earn at least two more credits than the number mandated for the YIS High School Diploma. Students transferring to YIS mid-way through grade 9 or later may receive credit for equivalent courses at other schools or have certain requirements waived with the approval of the head of academics.

In addition to the course credits listed above, it is required for graduation that students:

  • Show a sustained commitment to service over grades 11 and 12.
  • Complete a senior research paper (on an academic topic of the student’s choice) by the end of first semester of grade 12. (Note: The Extended Essay of the IBDP satisfies this requirement.)


Grades 9 and 10 Academic Program

International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (IBMYP)

The MYP is designed for students aged 11 to 16 and so the YIS high school program in grades 9 and 10 continues from our middle school program. It provides a framework of learning which encourages students to become creative, critical and reflective thinkers.

The MYP emphasizes intellectual challenge, encouraging students to make connections between their studies in traditional subjects and to the real world. It fosters the development of skills for communication, intercultural understanding and global engagement, qualities that are essential for life in the 21st century.

It builds upon the knowledge, skills and attitudes developed in the IB Primary Years Program (PYP) and prepares students to meet the academic challenges of the IB Diploma Program.




Grades 11 and 12 Academic Program

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IBDP)

Created in 1968, the IB Diploma Program is a two-year pre-university course of study that leads to the award of an IB Diploma. It is a truly international curriculum available to students in their last two years of high school, and it gives IB Diploma holders ac- cess to the world’s leading universities.

Although not an elite program, the IBDP does reward students who make a consistent effort over the two years of study. It is not only the content that is important but the process too. Students completing the IBDP are very well equipped for life at university.

While each component of the IBDP has specific aims and assessment objectives, the distinctive aims of the program as a whole are to:

• Provide an internationally accepted qualification for entry into higher education.
• Promote international understanding.
• Educate the whole person, emphasizing intellectual, personal, emotional, and social growth.
• Develop inquiry and thinking skills and the capacity to reflect upon and to evaluate actions critically.


IBDP Course Offerings at YIS

All candidates must take six subjects, three at higher level and three at standard level. One subject must be chosen from each of the first five groups. The sixth subject can be from group 6 or a second subject from groups 1, 2, 3, or 4.

Note: All courses are offered at standard and higher levels unless otherwise indicated. Ab Initio languages are only offered at standard level.


SL = standard level
HL = high level
L&L = Language and Literature
Lit = Literature
ITGS = Information Technology in a Global Society

* Students must take English in group 1 to meet YIS graduation requirements. Should students wish to take two group 1 courses, Japanese and German Language and Literature are on offer, and a bilingual diploma would be awarded. In addition, to encourage mother tongue languages, it is possible for students to study their mother tongue language as a school-supported self-taught subject (SL only). In such cases, two group 1 subjects would be studied and a bilingual diploma would be awarded. For more information, please contact the high school vice-principal.

**Environmental Systems and Societies is an interdisciplinary subject that covers the requirements of both groups 3 and 4. Taking Environmental Systems and Societies allows students to take two subjects from any of groups 1, 2, 3, 4, or 6 should they wish.

Please note: All courses are subject to maximum and minimum enrolment. YIS reserves the right to alter courses available. The decision to run, cancel, or move a class will be made with the best interests of all the students in mind.



Core Curriculum Requirements for IBDP Students

Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

TOK is a course comprised of 100 hours over three semesters. The course aims to examine critically the types, nature and limitations of different ways of knowing and different areas of knowledge. In the process, students consider the role of language, reason, emotion and perception in the pursuit of certainty and truth. In addition, students compare systems of knowledge and explore the assumptions and value judgments inherent within them.

Students are encouraged to explore TOK within the context of their own learning and lives and to consider the impact of cultural differences on knowledge issues. Texts and examples come from a wide range of cultural perspectives and knowledge areas, including the physical and social sciences, mathematics, the arts, politics, religion and ethics.

Students are assessed by means of a written assignment and an oral presentation. Up to three bonus points can be awarded on the basis of this written work in combination with the extended essay.

Extended Essay

The IB defines the extended essay as “an in-depth study of a limited topic within a subject.” The 4,000-word essay is meant to provide students with the opportunity to conduct independent research at an introductory level. In general, the skills required to produce a successful essay are those the student has been using in the relevant course.

Students should choose to work in an area they find interesting. For example, a student who chooses history must be interested in working with primary sources. Those selecting a science topic are strongly advised to undertake experimentally based investigations rather than library-based surveys. In Language A, students should be interested in the independent critical analysis of literary works. Under most circumstances, stu- dents are encouraged to confine their choices to the subjects they are studying.

When students have chosen the subject area of the extended essay, they begin to discuss their proposed topic with their supervisor. They must submit a detailed plan, including a specific research question for discussion. As an independent piece of research, it is critical that students takes a self-disciplined approach and adhere to deadlines. The extended essay is submitted during October seminar week in grade 12.

Creativity, Action, Service (CAS)

CAS is a fundamental part of the IB Diploma Program at YIS. Along with TOK and the extended essay, CAS is one of the three core elements in every student’s IBDP experience. Creativity is interpreted broadly to include a wide range of arts activities, as well as the creativity students demonstrate in designing and implementing service projects. Action can include not only participation in individual and team sports but also taking part in expeditions and in local or international projects. Service encompasses a host of community and social service activities. Some examples include helping children with special needs, visiting hospitals and working with refugees or homeless people. Students are expected to be involved in CAS activities for the equivalent of at least two to three hours each week during the two years of the program.




ONLINE LEARNING PROGRAM

In the 2017-18 academic year, YIS will continue to offer a limited number of grade 11 and 12 students the option of taking one of their IBDP courses online. These courses are identified in the course catalog with the notation “available online” next to the course name.

Online courses provide students with an opportunity to learn in a truly global classroom, with teachers and classmates from other IB schools around the world, and extend the options available to them. Online courses require a mature and self-directed approach to study. Students should be self-motivated and very confident using the Internet and wider technology. Further information about our online courses is available through our online course provider, Pamoja Education, at www.pamojaeducation.com.

Enrollment Limitations and Selection Criteria

Enrollment in the online courses is limited. Decisions on who can opt for online learning will be made on a case-by-case basis, with the following conditions, but not exclusively, taken into account:

• The desired course is offered at YIS but is oversubscribed.
• The course is needed for graduation or a college prerequisite and is not offered by YIS.
• The student has difficulty finding a third higher level course among YIS course options.
• The student’s teachers and tutors have determined that he or she is able to take on the challenge of independent online work.

Please Note: A student may only take one online course. Parents must sign a consent form to authorize online learning.

Credits

YIS will accept credits earned through online learning and count them towards graduation. An online report will be separate from the one issued by YIS and may be reported at different times than the YIS reports; however, all online courses will appear on the student’s YIS transcript. For transcript purposes, online term one and two will count toward the YIS semester one transcript and online term three and four will count toward the YIS semester two transcript.




2017-2018 Course Descriptions

Please note: Unless otherwise stated, all courses are worth one credit.


aRTS

Grade 9

Visual Arts Grade 9

This course aims to help students develop critical thinking skills and take a more proactive role in their own learning. Students learn to express opinions and analyze the characteristics of their own artwork and that of others using subject-specific vocabulary in their developmental workbook. Students will produce a variety of work in different media, including observational drawing and digital graphic design. They will have ample opportunity for exploring theory, discussion, presentations and feedback. They will present their own work to their peers and will engage in ongoing meaningful critical discourse. Students maintain a record of all completed work in their developmental workbooks, which can include planning, peer presentations and assessment exercises.

Music Grade 9

This course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of the music curriculum. The emphasis of the course is on practical music making and creativity; it involves listening, performing and composing. A study of a wide variety of musical styles and genres enables students to learn how to further their appreciation and enjoyment of music. Basic music theory and musical terms are taught, as well as more advanced musical knowledge appropriate to each topic covered. All topics involve composition tasks in different styles, and students are encouraged to develop their personal creative skills as much as possible. A record of their study, research and reflection is maintained in the developmental workbook. All students, whether complete beginners or experienced musicians, are given the opportunity to develop instrumental, vocal, and choral skills through individual and group performances. Students participate in regular classroom per- formances and perform in public concerts and at special school occasions.

Japanese Music Grade 9

This course is designed for students especially interested in studying a traditional Japanese musical instru- ment. Following the curriculum of the standard grade 9 music course, students deepen their understanding of the elements of music through work on solo and ensemble compositions for the thirteen and seventeen string kotos. Music theory and history are approached through the lenses of both Japanese and western musical traditions. A composition project incorporating Japanese instrumentation is another important as- pect of the course. All students are expected to participate in regularly scheduled concerts. Students having no previous experience with a Japanese instrument are encouraged to supplement their class work with additional study after school.

Drama Grade 9

This course is essentially practical, but students will be expected to keep an online journal of their explora- tion of drama in class. Students will create devised work for performance and work from play texts, practi- cally understanding drama concepts such as status, tension and focus, and seeing how meaning and at- mosphere can be presented to an audience. The class will also explore technical and practical elements of theatre such as lighting, make-up, prop making and set design, although the emphasis is on the de- velopment of well-rounded drama practitioners, both on and off stage. Assessment requirements include practical coursework, such as improvised scene work, technical theatre plans, written research projects and production of a one-act play.


Grade 10

Visual Arts Grade 10

This course aims to develop students’ creative and critical thinking skills to a more advanced level to al- low them to take responsibility for their own learning. Students will learn how to develop personal art and design work through an intensive creative process of research and idea in their developmental workbook. During this process they will express opinions and analyze the characteristics of artwork and their ideas us- ing subject-specific vocabulary. Students will also work on figure drawing adopting a variety of media and approaches. Students present their work to their peers and engage in regular meaningful critical discourse. A record of all completed work is maintained in their developmental workbooks.

Music Grade 10

This course is designed to build on students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in the music curriculum and further prepare them to take IBDP Music in grade 11. The emphasis of this course is on practical mu- sic making and creativity; it involves listening, performing, theory, analysis, world music and composing. A study of a wide variety of musical styles and genres enables students to learn how to further their apprecia- tion and enjoyment of music. Music theory and musical terms are taught, as well as more advanced musi- cal knowledge appropriate to each topic covered. All topics involve various composition tasks in different styles, and students are encouraged to develop their personal creative skills as much as possible. A record of their study, research and reflection is maintained in the developmental workbook. All students, whether complete beginners or experienced musicians, are given the opportunity to develop as performers through individual and group performances. Students participate in regular classroom performances and perform in public concerts and at special school occasions.

Japanese Music Grade 10

Following the curriculum of the standard grade 10 music course, this section is designed for the serious student who is looking to further his/her skills with a Japanese musical instrument in preparation for IBDP Music. In this performance-driven ensemble class, students work on advanced solo and ensemble composi- tions for the koto and bass koto. Japanese music theory and history are viewed in relation to other world music traditions while western theory and history receive more focused attention. A composition project for Japanese instrumentation, applying both Japanese and western musical elements is another important aspect. All students are expected to participate in regularly scheduled concerts.

Drama Grade 10

This course investigates ways of creating devised work for performance; working from text; writing evaluations about the creative process; understanding dramatic concepts such as status, tension and focus; being aware of theatrical styles, social issues and mixed media, e.g., a photo as stimuli for plot development; using suitable approaches in rehearsal to interpreting the stimuli; knowing the rationale for aesthetic choices; and seeing how meaning and atmosphere can be presented to an audience. Assessment requirements include practical coursework such as major group devised and monologue performances and directorial seminars based on practical work done in class.


Grades 11 & 12

Visual Arts (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

This course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundar- ies. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and work with a minimum of three different media. Students are encouraged to produce a body of resolved works and to demonstrate a deep consideration of how their resolved works communicate with a potential viewer. Students learn to become informed and critical observers of visual culture. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.

Music (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

Students should be prepared for a rigorous yet exciting course covering music theory, music history, world music, analysis and performance. A varied range of activities will be introduced to encourage students to engage with music from different times, places and cultures, critically appraise music and use appropriate musical terminology, develop techniques for comparative analysis, develop investigative and thinking skills, learn to create music, learn to perform music, work both independently and collaboratively, and develop reflection techniques to help them improve their performance over time. This course has rigorous standards with both internal and external assessments. External assessments include a musical links investigation and written listening paper. Internal assessments evaluate creating and performance and are then moderated externally. Students considering this course at higher level should have several years of performance experi- ence (vocal or instrumental) and a good understanding of music theory.

Theatre (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

The essence of this course is to participate in a wide range of theatre activities, such as improvisation, techni- cal production and acting techniques. Students will become familiar with forms of theatre from their own and other cultures and will keep a journal to explore and experiment individually and collaboratively. They will also explore different theatre traditions, such as Commedia dell Arte (Italian Renaissance Comedy), Wayang Kulit (Indonesian Shadow Puppetry) and Tribal Masquerade (African Mask). This is both a practical and theoretical course, exploring performance in the specialist theatre roles of creator, designer, director and performer. In addition to both collaborative group and solo practical work, scholastic skills such as writing a critique, pitching a directorial vision, and reflecting on dramatic achievements will ensure students become critical theatre practitioners. Internal assessments include a variety of practical experiences in each facet of theatre, e.g., acting, costuming, lighting, stage design as well as written research projects and visual plans.

Film SL (Online)

Credits: 2

Film is both a powerful communication medium and an art form. The course aims to develop students’ skills so they become adept both in interpreting others’ work and in creating their own films.Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in filmmaking, the IB film course explores film theory and history. The course will develop students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. Students are encouraged to develop the professional and technical skills (including organizational skills) needed to express themselves creatively in film. The course emphasises the importance of working individually and as a member of a group. At the core of IB film is a concern with clar- ity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis achieved through practical engagement in the art and craft of film.





ENGLISH

Grade 9

English B Grade 9

English Language Acquisition (English B) in grades 9 and 10 is designed for students whose first language is not English. The course focuses on the language skills needed for students to become proficient in English. Students will study a variety of texts from key linguistic genres using a range of reading skills, develop their speaking skills to express their own views on a range of topics, and acquire the necessary writing skills and strategies to produce different text types. In addition, students will continue to strengthen their vocabulary and grammar. Assessment tasks will include listening, speaking, reading and writing.

English Grade 9

The English program in grade 9 focuses on the development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Areas for development will include summary, analysis, evaluation, extraction and synthesis of informa- tion. Students will focus on writing and speaking for specific purposes and audiences. The literature studied includes a variety of genres: novels, drama (including Shakespeare), poetry, short stories, media and non- fiction. Assessment tasks include both oral and written assignments.

Grade 10

English B Grade 10

English Language Acquisition (English B) in grades 9 and 10 is designed for students whose first language is not English. The course focuses on the language skills needed for students to become proficient in English. Students will study a variety of texts from key linguistic genres using a range of reading skills, develop their speaking skills to express their own views on a range of topics, and acquire the necessary writing skills and strategies to produce different text types. In addition, students will continue to strengthen their vocabulary and grammar. Assessment tasks will include listening, speaking, reading and writing.

English Grade 10

The English program in grade 10 continues the development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills as well as the creative, critical and analytical skills taught in grade 9. Students will expand their experi- ence and knowledge of genres such as novels, drama (including Shakespeare), poetry, short stories, media and non-fiction. Assessment tasks, both oral and written, include creative, analytical, critical and empathetic assignments as well as opportunities to speak and write for different purposes and audiences. The goal is to prepare students for the IBDP English A Literature or English A Language and Literature courses.


Grades 11 & 12

English A: Literature (HL)

Credits: 2

Students taking this course read independently, carry out interpretation and analysis of the author’s style, and express thoughtful personal responses. They write and speak in a well-organized and convincing way, showing an appreciation of the author’s choices. They use formal language and show a mastery of literary terms and a critical awareness of their effects. Assessment tasks are derived from the IBDP externally set course requirements and will include both oral and written assignments. These are assessed against task- specific criteria: knowledge and understanding of the text, appreciation of the writer’s choices, organization and presentation, appreciation of the literary conventions of the genre and formal use of language.

English A: Language and Literature (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

Students taking this course read independently, carry out interpretation and analysis of the author’s style, research cultural and social influences, and express thoughtful personal responses to various text types. Students write and speak in a well-organized and convincing way, showing an appreciation of author choices and the possible influences on, and effects of, these choices. The aim of the course is to foster an understand- ing of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in literary and non-literary texts. Assessment tasks are derived from the IBDP externally set course requirements and will include both oral and written assignments. These are assessed against task-specific criteria: knowledge and understanding, response to the question, organization and presentation, understanding of the use of stylistic features and formal use of language.





MATHEMATICS

Grade 9

Standard Mathematics Grade 9

This course, together with its equivalent in grade 10, should be seen as a two-year course whose purpose is to prepare students for either the IBDP Mathematical Studies or Mathematics Standard Level courses in grades 11 and 12. This course is less technical and less academically challenging than the extended level course in grade 9 and is delivered at a slower pace; however, it remains demanding, focusing on develop- ing the students’ basic skills and confidence. The course includes units on trigonometry, geometry, algebra, number, and statistics. Investigative mathematics is a compulsory part of the course. A graphic display cal- culator is a requirement.

Extended Mathematics Grade 9

This course represents the first half of a two-year course for students who have a good level of mathemati- cal interest and aptitude. The purpose of the course, together with the equivalent course in grade 10, is to prepare students for either Standard Level or Higher Level Mathematics IBDP courses. More technology is used in this course than the standard grade 9 course, and the academic challenge is somewhat higher. This course focuses on developing the students’ analytical skills and covers a wide range of content including trigonometry, geometry, algebra, functions and statistics. Investigative mathematics is a compulsory part of the course. A graphic display calculator is a requirement.

Grade 10

Standard Mathematics Grade 10

This course is the second half of a two-year course for students wishing to be prepared for IBDP Mathematical Studies or Mathematics Standard Level in grades 11 and 12. This course is somewhat easier than the extended course in grade 10, and it is delivered at a slower pace; however, it remains academic and demanding. The course includes units of work on functions, statistics, finance, geometry, probability and mensuration. Investigative mathematics is a compulsory part of the course. A graphic display calculator is a requirement. Only students who show a good level of achievement in this course will be recommended for IBDP Mathematics Standard Level in grade 11.

Extended Mathematics Grade 10

This course represents the second half of a two-year course for students who have a good level of math- ematical interest and aptitude. This course focuses on developing the students’ analytical skills and covers a wide range of content including functions, statistics, trigonometry, algebra, probability, logarithms and proof. Investigative mathematics is a compulsory part of the course. A graphic display calculator is a requirement. This course prepares students for the IBDP Standard Level and Higher Level Mathematics courses, but only those who show a good level of achievement in this course will be recommended for Higher Level Mathematics in grade 11.


Grades 11 & 12

Mathematical Studies (SL only)

Credits: 2

This two-year course is aimed at preparing students for university courses that perhaps will not involve any further use of mathematics (for example, languages, history and arts). There is no minimum entry requirement for Mathematical Studies. The course covers some foundation work in number and algebra as well as topics covering descriptive statistics, logic, sets and probability, statistical applications, geometry and trigonometry, mathematical models, and an introduction to differential calculus. Students taking this course need to complete a mathematical project, which counts for 20 percent of the final grade; however, the scope of this project can be very wide, allowing the students to focus on an area of interest to them. A graphic display calculator is a requirement in this course.

Standard Level Mathematics

Credits: 2

This two-year course is aimed at preparing students for university level courses that may involve some mathematics (for example, social sciences). Students entering this course should have well-developed skills in mathematics as the course is technical and demanding, the content being a subset of the Higher Level syllabus. The course includes algebra, trigonometry, functions, calculus, statistics and probability, and vectors. In addition, a written piece of work, known as an exploration, needs to be completed during the course, as this counts for 20 percent of the final IBDP grade. A graphic display calculator is a requirement in this course.

Higher Level Mathematics

Credits: 2

This two-year course is aimed at preparing students for courses at university level that will have a high mathematical content (for example, engineering). Students who enroll in this course must have a high level of mathematical competency. The course includes algebra, complex numbers, trigonometry, functions, calculus, statistics and probability and vectors. An optional topic must also be taken in grade 12, and this allows the students the opportunity to delve more deeply into the chosen area. In addition, a written piece of work, known as an exploration, must be completed during the two years, as this counts for 20 percent of the final IBDP grade. A graphic display calculator is a requirement in this course.





MODERN LANGUAGES

Grade 9

Japanese Foreign Level – Intermediate Grade 9

The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities and personal and social life. Students will learn to write informative passages about a familiar theme and read and write Hiragana, Katakana, and an extensive amount of Kanji. Students will participate in simple group discussions related to social and teenage life and share their thoughts in writing. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Japanese Foreign Level – Advanced Grade 9

This course is designed for students who show a high level of competence in Japanese. The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities, personal and social life, and the international world. This course is meant to allow students to use the language with increasing proficiency, including the use of an extensive range of Kanji. Students learn to use the spoken and written language effectively for purposes of practical communication in oral presentations and in writing. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Spanish as a Foreign Language Grade 9 (beginners, beginners/intermediate)

The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities and personal and social life. By the end of the course students should be able to ex- press themselves in simple sentences about a familiar theme, engage in short conversations around a range of familiar themes, and write short informative passages. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics. Students who enroll in this course and continue in grade 10 will be able to take Spanish B SL in the IBDP.

French, Spanish as a Foreign Language Grade 9

Prerequisite: 2-3 years previous study

The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities, personal and social life, and the international world. This course is meant to extend students’ knowledge of past and future tenses, allowing them to use the language with increasing proficiency. Students learn to use the spoken and written language effectively for purposes of practical communication in oral presentations and in writing. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Japanese Native Level Grade 9

The objective of this course is to provide students with the linguistic skills necessary to read and understand a wide range of materials covering literature, culture, society and issues pertaining to people and their environment. Themes include the following: reading newspapers and expressing opinions about social issues; learning idiomatic phrases including proverbs, adages and sayings; four-kanji compound words, grammar, and honorific forms; and writing opinions on social issues. Emphasis is placed upon reading and writing. Assessment will be made through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Grade 10

Japanese Foreign Level –Intermediate Grade 10

The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities and personal and social life. The students will learn to write informative passages about a familiar theme and read and write Hiragana, Katakana and an extensive amount of Kanji. Students will participate in simple group discussions related to social and teenage life and share their thoughts in writing. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Japanese Foreign Level – Advanced Grade 10

This course is designed for students who show a high level of competence in Japanese. The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities, personal and social life, and the international world. This course is meant to allow students to use the language with increasing proficiency, including the use of an extensive range of Kanji. The students learn to use the spoken and written language effectively for purposes of practical communication in oral presentations and in writing. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Spanish as a Foreign Language Grade 10 (beginners, beginners/intermediate)

The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities and personal and social life. By the end of the course students should be able to ex- press themselves in simple sentences about a familiar theme, engage in short conversations around a range of familiar themes, and write short informative passages. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics. Students who enroll in this course will be able to take Spanish B in grade 11.

French, Spanish as a Foreign Language Grade 10

Prerequisite: 3-4 years previous study

The four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be developed around the main themes of everyday activities, personal and social life and the world around us. This course is meant to consolidate and extend the students’ knowledge of past and future tenses, allowing them to use the language with increasing proficiency. By the end of the course the students should be able to use the spoken and written language effectively for purposes of practical communication in oral presentations and in writing, and they will have developed the four language skills. The four language skills will be assessed through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.

Japanese Native Level Grade 10

The objective of this course is to provide students with the linguistic skills necessary to read and under- stand a wide range of materials covering literature, culture, society, and issues pertaining to man and environment. Themes include the following: reading newspapers and expressing opinions about social issues; learning idiomatic phrases including proverbs, adages and sayings; four-kanji compound words, grammar, and honorific forms; and writing opinions on social issues. At the end of the course students will have developed the ability to analyze longer and more difficult texts as well as the skills to communicate more complex ideas. Emphasis is placed upon reading and writing. Assessment will be made through a variety of tasks us- ing specific rubrics.

Grades 11 & 12

Japanese Ab Initio (SL only)

Credits: 2

The Japanese language ab initio course is a language learning course for beginners, designed to be followed over two years by students who have little or no previous experience of learning the target language. The main focus of the course is on the acquisition of language required for purposes and situations usual in everyday social interaction. The course aims to develop the four language skills and a basic awareness of the culture through the study of the core syllabus. The syllabus contains the following themes: individuals and society, leisure and work, urban and rural environment. At the end of the course students will have developed an ability to communicate effectively in a limited range of situations.

Language B: French, Spanish, German, Japanese (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

Mostly available at both higher and standard levels, the Language B courses occupy the middle ground of the group 2 modern languages spectrum and are language-learning courses for students with some previous experience of learning the target language. The main focus of these courses is on language acquisition and the development of skills considerably beyond those expected of an ab initio candidate, up to a fairly sophisticated degree at higher level. Language B courses give students the opportunity to reach a high degree of competence in a language and explore the culture(s) using the language. The courses provide an integrated study of grammar, literature and cultural aspects. At the end of these courses students will have developed an ability to communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations. Students in the higher level courses will demonstrate the ability to communicate more complex ideas and the ability to analyze longer and more difficult texts. They will also engage in an in-depth study of a few literary texts.

Language A: Japanese, German Language and Literature (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

Language A: Language and Literature is a course focusing on developing an understanding of the constructed nature of meanings generated by language. Two parts of the course relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. This course is designed for students with a very high level of proficiency in the target language. The Language A courses (SL and HL) focus on refining students’ language skills through analysis of literary texts and articles related to cultural topics. Students will learn to recognize and analyze aspects of style and register and to incorporate these aspects in their own writing. The students will need to use the target language accurately and show a high level of proficiency.

Mandarin Ab Initio SL, Spanish Ab Initio SL, French Ab Initio (Online)

Credits: 2

The ab initio course is a language learning course for beginners, designed to be followed over two years by students who have little or no previous experience of learning the target language. The main focus of the courses is on the acquisition of language required for purposes and situations usual in everyday social inter- action. The ab initio language courses aim to develop the four language skills and a basic awareness of the culture through the study of the core syllabus. The syllabus contains the following themes: the individual, education and work, town and services, the environment, health, etc. At the end of these courses students will have developed an ability to communicate effectively in a limited range of situations.




PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Grade 9

Physical Education Grade 9

The aim of the high school PE program is to develop a combination of transferable skills promoting physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development, and to encourage present and future choices that contribute to long-term healthy living and fitness for life. The curriculum actively contributes to every student’s personal and social education, providing opportunities for leadership, cooperation, reflection, teamwork, decision-making and problem solving. Students meet in PE for two 90-minute periods a week. Units include invasion games, net games, striking and fielding games as well as fitness and dance. Students in grade 9 will have one 45-minute period of Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) per week attached to their PE class. PSHE is a values-based core element addressing a wide range of topics.

Grade 10

Physical Education Grade 10

Grade 10 is the culminating year of MYP PE. An advanced emphasis is placed on the important concepts of community, leadership and coaching. Students actively inquire into recognized sports strategies, skills and teamwork. In order to give the students a chance to demonstrate their understanding, they complete a range of assessments, both formative and summative, over the course of the year. The final unit is student run with inquiry into sporting tournaments as they prepare, plan and put on the final high school sports day. Students in grade 10 PE will complete their PSHE course, meeting for the equivalent of one period per week.

Grades 11 & 12

Physical Education Grades 11-12

This course builds upon the foundations of physical skills, concepts, knowledge and attitudes developed in previous years’ PE courses. Much research suggests that students who participate in regular physical activity are better able to cope with anxiety and stress and improve academic performance. Students will move through this newly updated 2-year program and be involved in a variety of activities and games that will encourage them to keep up a lifelong interest in wellness and fitness. Students in grades 11-12 have one double period (90 mins) a week. Content includes outdoor and indoor invasion games, movement composition, net games, striking and fielding games, fitness as well as new activities such as bocce, yoga, nutritional studies (learn to cook basic meals) and dance crafted around their academic program. Students are not formally assessed but are expected to actively participate in every class and maintain a positive attitude.





SCIENCE

Grade 9

Science 9

The science course encourages students to explore aspects of the natural world and relationships between them. The focus for learning will be on knowledge and understanding, reasoning and attitudes in science. Topics will include aspects of chemistry, biology and physics. The course provides opportunities to develop the skills associated with both conceptual and experimental aspects of science. It also aims to make students aware of the responsibilities of practicing scientists in the discipline. Formative and summative assessments are used throughout the course, composed of class activities including lab work and homework. Topic tests are given regularly to reinforce study and exam skills.

Grade 10

Science 10

The science course encourages students to explore aspects of the natural world and relationships between them, building on the work completed in grade 9. The focus for learning will be on knowledge and under- standing, reasoning and attitudes in science. Topics will include aspects of chemistry, biology and physics. The course provides opportunities to develop the skills associated with both conceptual and experimental aspects of science. It also aims to make students aware of the responsibilities of practicing scientists in the discipline. Formative and summative assessments are used throughout the course, composed of class activities including lab work and homework. Topic tests are given regularly to reinforce study and exam skills. Students who complete this course will be well prepared for any of the IBDP science courses.

Grades 11 & 12

Environmental Systems and Societies (SL only)

Credits: 2

The major topics covered in the Environmental Systems and Societies course include the structure and function of ecosystems, population dynamics, biodiversity and human use of resources. Pollution, including global warming, is an emphasis. This course counts as a group 3 or 4 subject. Students will be encouraged to develop their knowledge of the concepts and the skills required for experimental work in the subject. During the course, students are expected to design and carry out a wide range of experiments, data analysis exercises and case studies. The internal assessment component consists of experimental work completed during the course. Formative and summative tasks will involve the design, analysis and evaluation of experimental work. Students are also assessed using a range of subject-related tasks and IBDP examination material throughout the course.

Biology (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

The major topics covered in the Biology course include aspects of cell biology, biochemistry, ecology, human health, and physiology. Students will be encouraged to develop their knowledge of the concepts and the skills required for experimental work in the subject. During the course, students are expected to design and carry out a wide range of experiments, data analysis exercises, and extended writing tasks. The internal assessment component consists of experimental work completed during the course. Formative and summative tasks will involve the design, analysis, and evaluation of experimental work. Students are also assessed using a range of subject-related tasks and IBDP examination material throughout the course.

Chemistry (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

The major topics covered in the Chemistry course include thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electro- chemistry and organic chemistry, with option topics of food chemistry, medicines and drugs, and human biochemistry. Students will be encouraged to develop their knowledge of the concepts and the skills required for experimental work in the subject. During the course, students are expected to design and carry out a wide range of experiments, data analysis exercises and extended writing tasks. The internal assessment component consists of experimental work completed during the course. Formative and summative tasks will involve the design, analysis and evaluation of experimental work. Students are also assessed using a range of subject related tasks and IBDP examination material throughout the course.

Physics (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

The major topics covered in the Physics course include measurement, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity, astrophysics, climate change, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students will be encouraged to develop their knowledge of the concepts and the skills required for experimental work in the subject. During the course, students are expected to design and carry out a wide range of experiments, data analysis exercises and extended writing tasks. The internal assessment component consists of experimental work completed during the course. Formative and summative tasks will involve the design, analysis and evaluation of experimental work. Students are also assessed using a range of subject related tasks and IBDP examination material throughout the course.





SOCIAL SCIENCES

Grade 9

Individuals & Societies Grade 9

Individuals & Societies is a two-year interdisciplinary course which introduces and develops students’ understanding of and skills in a range of social sciences, notably history, geography, government, economics and business. The course examines a broad range of key questions: Do leaders make history or does history make leaders? Who governs? Is human consumption sustainable? People versus profit? Is the world getting smaller? Development, nationalism, globalization and systems are the course’s core overriding concepts. The course is designed to be academically rigorous and provide students with an excellent introduction to and grounding in the group 3 IBDP courses: history, geography, economics and psychology.

Grade 10

Individuals & Societies Grade 10

Individuals & Societies is an exciting interdisciplinary course which introduces and develops students’ understanding of and skills in a range of social sciences, notably history, geography, government, economics and business. The course examines a broad range of key questions: Do leaders make history or does history make leaders? Who governs? Is human consumption sustainable? People versus profit? Is the world getting smaller? Development, nationalism, globalization, and systems are the course’s core overriding concepts. The course is designed to be academically rigorous and provide students with an excellent introduction to and grounding in the group 3 IBDP courses: history, geography, economics and psychology.

Grades 11 & 12

Geography (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

The Geography curriculum covers a number of topics in three main areas: patterns and change, optional themes, and global interactions. All students cover the first two areas, while the global interactions section is only for students taking geography at the higher level. Through the curriculum content this subject aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment, develop a concern for human welfare and the quality of the environment, appreciate the relevance of geography in analyzing contemporary issues and challenges, and develop a global perspective of diversity and change. There are four assessment objectives for this course: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of specified content, demonstrate application and analysis of knowledge and understand- ing, demonstrate synthesis and evaluation, and select, use, and apply a variety of appropriate skills and techniques. All students will write two examinations and submit one fieldwork report. Higher level students will write a third examination.

History (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

This modern world history course examines communism in crisis in both China and the USSR, the Cold War, authoritarian rulers such as Stalin, Hitler and Mao, causes, practices and effects of the two world wars and other proxy wars, while focusing in depth on the transformations of China and Japan. Higher order thinking skills are developed through engaging classroom activities. The course aims to promote an understanding of history through an understanding of the impact of historical developments at national, regional and international levels, and to develop an awareness of one’s own historical identity through the study of the historical experiences of different cultures. IBDP assessment is made up of two exam papers for standard level students and three exam papers for higher level students, as well as an internal assessment. Externally set and marked exams require students to undertake source analysis as well as compose structured and extended responses based on the various topics studied over the two-year course. The internal assessment takes the form of an historical investigation.

Economics (HL and SL) - Also available online

Credits: 2

Economics is a dynamic social science dealing with concepts such as scarcity, resource allocation, ethics, decision-making, environmental sustainability and globalization. All students will study theories from the four main pillars of the subject: microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics and development economics. Higher level students cover extension topics with added depth and breadth, including theory of the firm, game theory, and absolute and comparative advantage. However, all these are not studied in a vacuum; rather they are applied to real world issues. The course encourages students to develop a truly international perspective while raising awareness of their own responsibilities as global citizens. Assessment is made up of two exam papers for standard level students and three for higher level students. The exams require students to complete data response questions and write extended responses. In addition, all students will complete a portfolio of internal assessments. While not a prerequisite, a strong mathematics background can make elements of the higher level course more accessible.

Psychology (HL and SL)

Credits: 2

The IBDP psychology course is a two-year course that examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on behavior, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater under- standing of themselves and to appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IBDP psychology. The course takes a holistic approach that fosters intercultural understanding and respect. In the core of the course, the biological level of analysis demonstrates what all humans share, whereas the cognitive and sociocultural levels of analysis reveal the immense diversity of influences that produce human behavior and mental processes. The optional focus areas of human relationships and abnormal psychology allow students the opportunity to study a specialized area of psychology in depth. Cultural diversity is explored and stu- dents are encouraged to develop empathy for the feelings, needs, and lives of others within and outside their own culture.

Business & Management (HL and SL) - Online only

Credits: 2

The Business and Management SL course aims to help students understand the implications of business activity in a global market. It is designed to give students an international perspective on business and to promote their appreciation of cultural diversity in the business environment. The ideals of international co- operation and responsible citizenship are at the heart of the course, which encourages the appreciation of ethical concerns and issues of social responsibility in the global business environment. Students should be able to make sense of the forces and circumstances that drive and restrain change in an interdependent and multicultural world. The course will contribute to students’ development as critical and effective participants in local and world affairs.

Information Technology in a Global Society (HL and SL) - Online only

Credits: 2

This course involves the study and evaluation of the impact of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. The course explores the advantages and disadvantages of “digital culture” and provides a framework for the student to make informed judgements and decisions about the use of IT within contemporary social contexts. ITGS offers students an opportunity for systematic study of a range of technological, social and ethical issues which fall outside the scope of any single discipline. The course develops students’ understanding of the capabilities of current and emerging IT systems and the impact of these systems on a range of stakeholders. Students are encouraged to apply their knowledge of existing IT systems to various scenarios and to make informed judgements about the effects of IT developments on these scenarios. Furthermore, students are required to use their knowledge of IT systems and practical IT skills to justify IT solutions for a specified client or end-user. In higher level, students study two extension topics: “IT systems in organizations” and “robotics, artificial intelligence and expert systems.” The course has an additional externally assessed component that comprises a previously seen case study based on a fictitious organization; this allows students to research various aspects of the subject, which may include new technical concepts and additional subject content, in greater depth.

Philosophy SL - Online only

Credits: 2

The emphasis of the IB Philosophy course is very much on doing philosophy. Students develop their skills through the study of philosophical themes and the close reading of philosophical texts. They also learn to apply their philosophical knowledge and skills to real-life examples or situations and how non-philosophical material can be treated in a philosophical way. Philosophical questions are explored through an examination of themes and texts. Students learn through tools, such as critical and systematic thinking, careful analysis and evaluation, and construction of arguments. Students are challenged to develop their own philosophical voice and independence of thought. IB Philosophy aims to bring the subject of philosophy alive, gaining a sense of its richness and practical value in daily life and expanding our appreciation of ourselves and the world around us. It teaches us not what to think, but how to think. By participating in the great philosophical debates, students will develop their skills of rigorous reasoning; by study, analysis and criticism of the great works of philosophy, ancient and modern, students will develop their capacity to make reasoned judgments for themselves.





DESIGN

Grade 9

Design Grade 9

The grade 9 Design course allows students to explore the creative uses of technology within the structure of the design cycle. The course takes on a number of practical design projects and uses the design cycle as a framework for guided inquiry and project management. The emphasis of class work is on process rather than product. Students are encouraged to investigate different applications and issues of technology and design within society.

Grade 10

Design Grade 10

The grade 9 Design course allows students to further explore the creative uses of technology within the structure of the design cycle. The course takes on a number of practical design projects and uses the design cycle as a framework for guided inquiry and project management. The emphasis of class work is on process rather than product. Students are encouraged to investigate different applications and issues of technology and design within society.





Course Selection Process

To facilitate the construction of a schedule that meets the needs of as many students as possible, we are asking students entering grades 9 and 11 to make preliminary choices or their “wish list” of course options in November. Students entering grades 10 and 12 will generally be continuing their courses from the previous year, although some course selections for electives will be required for students entering grade 10. Mr. Redlich will provide students with links to the online sign-up form.

Please note: Students are not guaranteed their “wish list” for classes. This data will be used to prepare schedules that meet the needs of the greatest number of students. Students will make final choices based on the blocks available later in the year. YIS reserves the right to alter courses available. The decision to run, cancel, or move a class will be made with the best interests of all students in mind.



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