Social Sciences

Grade 9 (MYP)

All grade 9 courses are 1 credit.
Individuals & Societies Grade 9

Individuals & Societies is a two-year interdisciplinary course which introduces and develops students’ understanding of and skills in a range of social sciences, notably history, geography, government, economics and business. The course examines a broad range of key questions: Do leaders make history or does history make leaders? Who governs? Is human consumption sustainable? People versus profit? Is the world getting smaller? Development, nationalism, globalization and systems are the course’s core overriding concepts. The course is designed to be academically rigorous and provide students with an excellent introduction to and grounding in the group 3 IBDP courses: history, geography, economics and psychology.

Grade 10 (MYP)

All grade 10 courses are 1 credit.
Individuals & Societies Grade 10

Individuals & Societies is an exciting interdisciplinary course which introduces and develops students’ understanding of and skills in a range of social sciences, notably history, geography, government, economics and business. The course examines a broad range of key questions: Do leaders make history or does history make leaders? Who governs? Is human consumption sustainable? People versus profit? Is the world getting smaller? Development, nationalism, globalization, and systems are the course’s core overriding concepts. The course is designed to be academically rigorous and provide students with an excellent introduction to and grounding in the group 3 IBDP courses: history, geography, economics and psychology.

Grades 11 & 12 (DP)

All DP social sciences courses are two-year courses earning 2 credits. See also online DP course offerings.


Economics (HL and SL)

Economics is a dynamic social science dealing with concepts such as scarcity, resource allocation, ethics, decision-making, environmental sustainability and globalization. All students will study theories from the four main pillars of the subject: microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics and development economics. Higher level students cover extension topics with added depth and breadth, including theory of the firm, game theory, and absolute and comparative advantage. However, all these are not studied in a vacuum; rather they are applied to real world issues. The course encourages students to develop a truly international perspective while raising awareness of their own responsibilities as global citizens. Assessment is made up of two exam papers for standard level students and three for higher level students. The exams require students to complete data response questions and write extended responses. In addition, all students will complete a portfolio of internal assessments. While not a prerequisite, a strong mathematics background can make elements of the higher level course more accessible.


Environmental Systems and Societies (SL only)

The major topics covered in the Environmental Systems and Societies course include the structure and function of ecosystems, population dynamics, biodiversity and human use of resources. Pollution, including global warming, is an emphasis. Students will be encouraged to develop their knowledge of the concepts and the skills required for experimental work in the subject. During the course, students are expected to design and carry out a wide range of experiments, data analysis exercises and case studies. The internal assessment component consists of experimental work completed during the course. Formative and summative tasks will involve the design, analysis and evaluation of experimental work. Students are also assessed using a range of subject-related tasks and IBDP examination material throughout the course.

Note: This course may count as either a group 3 (Individuals and Societies) or group 4 (Experimental Sciences) subject.


Geography (HL and SL)

The Geography curriculum covers a number of topics in three main areas: patterns and change, optional themes, and global interactions. All students cover the first two areas, while the global interactions section is only for students taking geography at the higher level. Through the curriculum content this subject aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment, develop a concern for human welfare and the quality of the environment, appreciate the relevance of geography in analyzing contemporary issues and challenges, and develop a global perspective of diversity and change. There are four assessment objectives for this course: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of specified content, demonstrate application and analysis of knowledge and understanding, demonstrate synthesis and evaluation, and select, use, and apply a variety of appropriate skills and techniques. All students will write two examinations and submit one fieldwork report. Higher level students will write a third examination.


History (HL and SL)

This modern world history course examines communism in crisis in both China and the USSR, the Cold War, authoritarian rulers such as Stalin, Hitler and Mao, causes, practices and effects of the two world wars and other proxy wars, while focusing in depth on the transformations of China and Japan. Higher order thinking skills are developed through engaging classroom activities. The course aims to promote an understanding of history through an understanding of the impact of historical developments at national, regional and international levels, and to develop an awareness of one’s own historical identity through the study of the historical experiences of different cultures. IBDP assessment is made up of two exam papers for standard level students and three exam papers for higher level students, as well as an internal assessment. Externally set and marked exams require students to undertake source analysis as well as compose structured and extended responses based on the various topics studied over the two-year course. The internal assessment takes the form of an historical investigation.


Psychology (HL and SL)

IBDP psychology course is a two-year course that examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on behavior, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and to appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IBDP psychology. The course takes a holistic approach that fosters intercultural understanding and respect. In the core of the course, the biological level of analysis demonstrates what all humans share, whereas the cognitive and sociocultural levels of analysis reveal the immense diversity of influences that produce human behavior and mental processes. The optional focus areas of human relationships and abnormal psychology allow students the opportunity to study a specialized area of psychology in depth. Cultural diversity is explored and students are encouraged to develop empathy for the feelings, needs, and lives of others within and outside their own culture.

Powered by Finalsite